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The posts on this blog are provided 'as is' with no warranties and confer no rights. The opinions expressed on this site are my own and do not necessarily represent those of my past,future or present employer or any organizations i might belong to unless explicitly stated that is the case.

Monday, February 19, 2007

When What i Say and do Probably Matters the Most

Stowe Boyd a fellow Media2.0 Workgroup member posted this morning on the traffic and flow of personal data streams which was prompted by Emily Chang's desire to have a data stream that would allow her and others to look at her activity based on "time, date, type of activity, location, memory, information interest, and so on. What was I bookmarking, blogging about, listening to, going to, and thinking about? I still had the urge to have an information and online activity mash-up that would allow me to discover my own patterns and to share my activity across the web in one chronological stream of data (to start with anyway)". The premise of the feasibility of such a data stream is of course the delivery protocol of RSS and Emily Chang also requests the ability to store that information locally for local archiving and searching.

Recently i was having a IM conversation with Chris Saad who also has something to say about this subject, and told him that what i wanted and saw an interesting market for was an enterprise behind the firewall version (obviously with the ability to publish publicly or to customers/partners based on actions and/or domains). I admit, i spend a lot of my time 'working' even when i not the 'on the clock' and i am cruising the web, reading through my RSS feeds etc.. I always have my eye out for information that i can use or would be valuable to share with work colleagues and use a mish-mash of tools to do so.

Which leads me to this post on when what i say and do probably matters the most from a knowledge sharing and revenue growth opportunity. Here is some of what i would like a personal enterprise data stream to potentially look like:


  • identify time and date of the actions i completed and/or have been tasked with etc .[combining the notion of a calendar, task list, bookmarking/tagging, blogging memory/notes etc.]
  • prompt work flow based on completed action- push my data into a traffic flow [e.g. i update a sales activity in the CRM putting it into 'contract' my Project Manager is assigned and it becomes part of their data stream-and then on to the developer and on an on- all easily tracked back to me and to the things that i originally associated that idea/deal with
  • i write an e-mail to a client that can be reused- by myself or others- i put it into my data stream- tagged by client, topic etc. a colleague- reuses it and it goes into her data stream and on an on- all easily tracked back to me the original source
  • i pull a marketing brochure of our internal portal and customize it for a specific client, the use of that marketing piece and the customization becomes part of my data flow- allowing others to reuse it and for me to easily track back to it
  • my data stream must be mineable - so my personal profile pushes 'information' from multiple 'applications' that i might not have time to go look at or even know that valuable information is there [e.g. marketing/product database, new deals etc.]. The information push would be based on my personal profile-all that data in my stream. It would all easily be tracked back to my original interest (because how many times have i forgotten when i first read something or had that original thought!)

I think that solutions like the ones the Emily and Stowe are calling for will be made available in the consumer space shortly and many like Emily points out are hacking away at delivering them. In the enterprise, the issues of privacy, security and ownership are huge challenges that would need to be overcomed (a big BIG issue would be 'who owns my data streams' well i do no?- but can i take it with me when i leave?).

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